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Posts Tagged ‘social web’

Picture 9So I’m working on an exciting project in the comedy writing biz. It’s called Gutenberg Lampoon (@goooooootenberg.) It will be a comedy blog network delivering articles and video content to you, and inviting you to submit your own pictures, articles, and videos.

Yeah, we’ve seen this before. So how will it change how you get your laughs online? It’ll change the way you interact with these articles, pictures, and video: how they’re organized, how you add your own content, and how it’s shared. So, in a sense, we’re building the community side of the online comedy world, giving you better tools to find, watch, read, and submit funny stuff.

So we’re gearing up for a 2010 launch. And once you join our community, you’ll be able to start submitting your best damn content to win prizes and the glorious attention of going viral. Visit Gutenberg Lampoon to sign up your email address for updates and the chance to join the community before our official launch. And you can visit our Twitter, blog, or Facebook page.

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Facebook recently changed their terms and conditions to not-so-subtly say that they owned our data when users disabled their accounts. Meaning your photos, notes, wall posts would be property of Facebook.

People raised a fit! Boy howdy, did they raise a fit. Facebook saw a surge of accounts disabled. People wrote them, blogged nasty posts, and cursed the ground Mark Zuckerberg walked on.

Er, well, maybe that last part was just me.

Well, Facebook is saying they made a whoopsie.

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But I find it odd that they’d make the announcement so late. Maybe it’s a political move…like politicians hoping for a damaging story to happen on a Friday so that news organizations might not catch the move.

I’m not sure.

Either way, feel free to post, write, upload. It’s your property (for now.)

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picture-31Yesterday Facebook added the Like feature (as seen next to the comment button in the pic). The button mimics Digg and other social sites, allowing users to show their support of a user’s action without commenting. It saves some time, but is it really necessary?

As someone in awe of the Twitter movement, I’ve got to compare the microblog to Facebook. The former is blissful simplicity, and the latter looks like a blob engulfing other site’s ideas. Facebook is now a cocktail made from Twitter, WordPress, Digg, Flickr, and Hulu. It’s all those services centralized. The problem is centralization doesn’t equal an effective user interface. It can, but how do we define Facebook now? It used to be defined as “a place where we caught up with distant friends.” Now, the definition is convoluted.

Our Facebook accounts are cluttered with so many interactions, and it seems Twitter has focused those interactions into 4 primary means. Twitter isn’t just simpler, it’s more conductive. Our interactions on Twitter happen with ease. Let me show you.

Let’s say I want to talk about “In the Beginning” at Dallas Theater Center on Facebook:

  1. First, I choose how I’ll talk about it. I can make a status update (probably the easiest); I could write a note (more lengthy); I can go to a theater group (reach a target audience who cares about what I say); or I can comment on Dallas Theater Center’s page (people definitely care.)
  2. So let’s go to the next step in the interaction for each one (sigh). I write a status update that I enjoyed the show, and people can write their comments agreeing or disagreeing as well as pushing the new like button. Easy enough. Writing a note. I will get out my full opinion, tag some friends, and in return they can comment on the note. Theater group. I can start a discussion group and post the first comment, and people can continue the discussion with their own comments. Bonus: I might reach people who aren’t my friends. Dallas Theater Center’s page. I can comment on the page, and maybe someone from DTC will respond to my review as well as friends and new people.

Okay….wow….that was a lot. Now let’s look at Twitter. If I liked the show, I can tweet:

I ❤ @dallastheater‘s new production “In the Beginning.” It’s brilliant, riveting; acting = superb #theater.

And…I just did everything that Facebook can do in my 1 tweet. I got my review out in the same amount of characters as a status update, people can respond to me with the @reply, my hashtag will reach theater people, and @replying DTC will let them know about my review….

Thus, I rest my case that Facebook is becoming more cluttered than effective.

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